Dobot: Bring Industrial Precision To Low Cost Robots

Unsatisfied by low cost, low precision and poor functionality desktop robotic arms on the market, a group of six hardcore robot makers decided to quit their high-paying industry jobs, and build their own. Named its first product Dobot, the team’s mission is to bring industrial precision to consumer, affordable robotic arms that can actually DO the job.

Fully designed and assembled in China, a new desktop, 4-axis, stepper motor, high precision robotic arm Dobot is launching its first Kickstarter campaign on September 15th, 2015 (Beijing Time).

 

The robot has tackled a series of technical difficulties struggled by other analogs. Here’s a list of its feature highlights:

 

  • High mechanical accuracy (0.02mm)
  • High repeat precision (0.2mm), 50 times better than uArm
  • Stepper motor equipped with high accuracy reducer
  • High strength aluminium alloy surface and processed by anodic oxidation treatment
  • Mechanical structure assembled by the state of art CNC cutting technology, ensuring its superb agility, stability and durability
  • Seven control methods including PC, mobile app, voice, vision, leap motion, geature and EEG (mind control, see demo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxU7ZhStuPA)
  • Easy click-and-drag control interface for beginners and also programmable for advanced makers, using Processing, Arduino, and C/C++ as primary languages
  • Affordable price starting with $399

 

For making it even more friendlier to both makers and the general public, Dobot’s design is well-fit for desktop applications, see its tech specifications:

  • Number of Axes: 4
  • Weight: 3kg
  • Payload: 500g
  • Range: 270 degree rotation
  • Position repeatability: 0.2mm
  • Material: aluminium alloy 6061
  • Controller: Arduino Mega2560
  • Communication: UART/Bluetooth
  • Power Supply: 12V 5A DC

 

The team has premiered its prototype at the 2015 Shenzhen Maker Faire, and has received positive feedback from makers, robot experts and open hardware communities ever since. “…the motion is really precise…it’s not just a toy, it can also be used to build stuff.” Says the CEO of Arduino, Massimo Banzi. On the popular DIY sharing platform Instrucables, its step-by-step instruction on building a robotic arm has received more than 23k likes in the first four days and got featured on the first page.

 

Upon their launch on Kickstarter, the team is very optimistic on the future performance of Dobot, marching their way to helping the world’s robot lovers to explore the beauty excitement of making stuff.

 

About the Team

The team was founded in June 2014 by a group of industrial robot engineers based in Shenzhen. The team’s CEO, Jerry (Peichao) Liu, and the head of engineering Art (Xulin) Lang both graduated from Shandong University in mechanics engineering. Jerry received its Masters from China Academy of Sciences, majoring in mechanics engineering and joined a robot company focusing on industrial robots for medical applications. Art during his Masters program, solely designed Delta parallel manipulator, Scara robot and a few others. After school, as the head of Scara robot project, he worked with Foxconn. All the founders all acquired extensive industry experience in robotics before joining the team. They have deep belief in bringing industrial precision robots to everyone’s desktop and in the future will launch a series of new models.

WiFi DyIO Robotics Controller and BowerStudio Software

*Kickstarter launching on September 15, 2015 at
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/neuronrobotics/wifi-dyio-robot-controller-w-24-channels

The WiFi DyIO (dynamic input and output device) is a wireless
micro-controller with 24 channels for robots, precision lasers, medical
equipment, 3D printers, motors, cameras, data sensors and more. With the
second generation WiFi DyIO, you can control all your devices with a
computer or Android phone—even with little programing knowledge. And
because WiFi DyIO simply coordinates the processors on your computer
wirelessly to your robot, it operates with JAVA programing language from
across the room, or around the globe.

The controller works seamlessly with Neuron Robotics Cooperative’s
<https://neuronrobotics.com> free, open-source
software, BowlerStudio, which allows the virtual design and testing of
different robotics systems and parts. There are powerful modeling tools for
adept programmers, as well as easy-to-use, customizable templates for
first-time designers. Features include coordination with 3D printers to
quickly and effortlessly print custom limbs, bodies and other parts.

The DyIO/BowlerStudio system is simple and intuitive for classroom lessons
with 8-year-olds, and powerful enough for a Ph.D robotics engineer. Its
software was used to perform surgery within an MRI
<http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/medical-robots/inside-an-mri-a-nonmetallic-robot-performs-prostate-surgery>
and the DyIO itself is used to teach classes at Worcester Polytechnic
Institute.

DyIO and BowlerStudio have been featured on 3DPrint.com, 3ders.org and is a
semifinalist for the Hackaday Prize.

The first generation, USB-connection DyIOs are available at Microcenters
throughout the U.S. and are being used in college and grade school
classrooms. In order to take the functional WiFi-enabled prototype into
production, Neuron Robotics Cooperative is looking to Kickstarter for
$35,000.

Starfish underwater Drone

For the average person, the word drone likely brings one of several images to mind. One of those is the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles more commonly used by the military.

People with various levels of training and intelligence can now buy various versions of „copter“ drones, depending only on their budget. What logically follows are reports of people crashing their new toys (some costing $1,000 or more) into people or buildings, perhaps a testament to how little thought has gone into the idea.

Even Amazon is toying with the idea of using drones to deliver orders of laundry detergent or whatever it is that a conventional courier service can’t get to you fast enough before you run out.
The point is, when we think of drones, we typically think about one direction and that is up.

SheerTech, a Canadian industrial design company, is about to expand our directional thinking with a nifty little device that’s sure to be a hit with the underwater diving community.
It’s calling its invention the Starfish Underwater Quadradiver Robot and it won’t take you long to figure how this entirely capable device could quickly become an indispensable tool on a recreational dive boat (or any boat where fun and utility are the objective).

The Starfish—we’ll shorten the name from here on—connects its human operator on the surface with a 300-foot umbilical cord (which obviously defines how deep the device will go).
But as divers will already know, 300 feet is a long way down and there’s a good deal that can be done between the surface and that depth.
Connected to an IPad or Android device, the Starfish is naturally buoyant (which makes the surface set-up that much easier). The four 12-volt thruster motors are used to maneuver both downward and laterally and there’s a video camera as well as a maneuverable grappling hook capable of securing items weighing up to 500 pounds before the operator pulls the Starfish to the surface.

Mario Thibert, a master diver who once owned his own dive boat, is one who sees the potential of Starfish for the underwater diving community.
Writing on his website Thibert (http://www.crowdfunding-reviews.com) looked at Starfish from the diver’s perspective, and applauded the idea.
„This is not just a gadget for finding things at the bottom of the lake,“ writes Thibert. „This is a business.“
Thibert writes from experience, having owned a dive boat that operated on the St. Lawrence River, one of the busiest summer dive spots in the area off the province of Quebec, Canada.
„At the end of the day, we’d drive around in the boat near popular wrecks where there could be 150-200 divers on a weekend and we’d ‚drift‘ around where the boats would have been,“ Thibert writes. „People would drop things—a lot of stuff—when they were going down the moor line at a 45 degree angle and we’d pick up stuff like dive computers, BCDs, regulators, tanks, you name it.“

 

On the downside of that exercise, as divers well know, there’s a lot of work associated with just scouting around, not least of which is the need for a dive buddy.
With Starfish, trolling for treasure would become a lot easier—and potentially a lot more profitable.
Even at $2,000 per unit (the Kickstarter campaign runs until October 14) a dive community that’s accustomed to moderately hefty price tags will see the value.
Indeed, Thibert admits he paid $1,500 for a tethered camera alone.
„This is really an amazing product,“ he writes on his review site. „For a scuba diver, $2,000 is peanuts for something like this. There’s a lot of value here.“

The Starfish Underwater Quadradiver Robot is featured on Kickstarter (link https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1066181261/starfish-underwater-quadradiver-robot).

BumbleBeeBot – for Teaching Robotics and Programming to Kids

OpenElectrons have started a Kickstarter Campaign for an Arduino based robot called BumbleBeeBot to teach programming and robotics to young kids.
OpenElectrons is the affiliate of mindsensors.com, which makes sensors and controllers for LEGO Mindstorms.

BumbleBeeBot is a low cost kit with progressively complex programming environments.
For the younger audience, the bot uses Scratch like graphical programming environment.
Scratch is already widely adopted in schools and makes programming easy for children.
Growing students can then transition to miniBloq which is graphical programming interfacing to Arduino.
At advance level, students can directly program in Arduino IDE using C/C++.

The BumbleBeeBot has gone through pilot programs in schools and afterschool robotics classes in
Richmond, Virginia, and now they’re seeking funding for production.

#BumblebeeBot for Teaching #Robotics and #Programming to Kids:
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1842571016/bumblebeebot-for-teaching-robotics-and-programming

Rokit Smart: Build and Program Robots the Easy Way

On May 14, 2015, Robolink, Inc is launching a campaign on Kickstarter for Rokit
Smart, an innovative and affordable robot kit that teaches kids how to program and
build robots in as little as one hour. With Rokit Smart, kids as young as 8 years old
can program these robots to autonomously follow a track, be controlled by remote
and many other exciting tasks. Rokit Smart includes instructions to build twelve
different robots, but the only limit to what kids can build with this kit is their
imagination. Until now, there has never been a robotics kit with so many potential
options for such a low price point. Rokit Smart will bring the excitement of robotics
to kids who never before considered the idea that they could build and program
their own robot.

Thousands of elementary school students across Southern California have tested
prototypes for Rokit Smart and they have all been amazed at how easy it is to build
and program their own robot. “When I see how much fun kids are having as the
robot they just built dribbles a ball or navigates a maze, it always brings a huge
smile to my face,” says Hansol Hong, Robolink’s CEO. Discovering how the
motors, sensors, linkages and software of a robot interact with each other has
proven to be a fantastic way of introducing young students to science, technology,
engineering and mathematics, also known as STEM education.

After building and programming the out-of-the-box robots, kids will be able to apply
what they learned and make their own robot. Rokit Smart is compatible with
Arduino, a programming language designed for robots that they can download for
free. “Learning to program our robots is a perfect stepping stone into languages like
C and C++. That’s going to be an incredibly valuable skill as these kids get older,”
says Hong.

The Kickstarter campaign for Rokit Smart has a goal of $50,000 by June 16th. The
money will pay for the manufacturing of the first run of Rokit Smarts. The first 100
backers will have the opportunity to secure a Rokit Smart for $99, a savings of 32%
off of the retail price.

For more information, visit the Kickstarter page here.

The Robolink community has already posted some very helpful resources for robot
builders at robolink.com/community.

Husarion Launches Kickstarter Campaign for Build-Your-Own Robot Device

Husarion’s RoboCORE Offers Easy and Affordable Way for Anyone to Construct a DIY Robot

Krakow, Poland – February 11, 2015 – Husarion, a Poland-based technology start-up, today announced it is seeking funding for RoboCORE, a device that acts as the “heart” of the DIY robot. Husarion’s mission is to bring robotics into the mainstream consumer market and RoboCORE offers the ultimate solution that allow robotics enthusiasts and companies to easily build their own robots, without the need for high-level programming or engineering skills.

Husarion founders are looking to raise $50,000 to bring RoboCORE to market. Over the next 30 days, investors may support and track Husarion’s campaign at the official project page on Kickstarter. 

The market for consumer and office robots is surging. A recent report from Business Insider Intelligence found that the multibillion-dollar global market for robotics, long dominated by industrial and logistics uses, has begun to see a shift toward new applications. According to BI, There will be a $1.5 billion market for consumer and business robots by 2019. BI also projects the market for consumer and office robots will grow at a CAGR of 17 percent between 2014 and 2019, seven times faster than the market for manufacturing robots.

“The design and production of robot components is so costly that robots are currently used mainly for military and industrial purposes,” said Dominik Nowak, CEO at Husarion. “There’s been little or no opportunity for robotics to become widespread. Our mission is to make out-of-the-box modules available so that anyone can create an inexpensive robot with advanced capabilities.”

RoboCORE is a combination of software and hardware, packaged in a sleek, heart-shaped device. Unlike other robotics systems, RoboCORE allows users to control or code from anywhere in the world, as well as stream both audio and video. RoboCORE’s rich peripherals, high-performance CPU and intuitive software enable robot makers to create without limits.

Building simple telepresence robots with a RoboCORE module is easy. Consumers can simply use old smartphones and tablets to control the robot by connecting them to an app, and then connect the construction with a cloud app, using a Wi-Fi or mobile (3G, LTE) network. The cloud-based RoboCORE app is a hub for managing all robots. Users can log in through a web browser, program and control the robot, and even share their project with friends.

RoboCORE will be useful for a variety of business settings and in solving real human problems. The module is also ideal for students and hobbyists, who will now be able to create and design complicated constructions that were previously impossible to build inexpensively, or without advanced programming skills. In addition, RoboCORE is compatible with any mechanics system, including pieces from popular LEGO® MINDSTORMS® sets.

The small (115×125 mm for the basic version, 82×82 mm for mini) device conceals a number of components with high scaling capabilities. Internal components include the Cortex-M4 core microcontroller, Intel Edison miniature computer with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity, DC engine ports with encoders, sensor ports, extension modules (for instance, for servomechanisms), a slot for microSD cards, and a microUSB socket. On Kickstarter, Husarion is also presenting the RoboCORE-mini, an even smaller module with basic features for beginners, as well as extensions.

 “We believe that today’s consumer robotics is at the same development stage as the computer industry in the late 1970’s. Not many people then appreciated young electronics enthusiasts. Now, it’s similar with robot makers,” says Radoslaw Jarema, CTO of Husarion. “We’ve created RoboCORE because we know that the world is on the eve of another technological revolution. The age of the personal computer has been here for a while—and now it’s time for personal robots. We hope that the Kickstarter community will receive our project well and support it.”

15-foot-tall robots coming to a reality near you!

Boston-based engineers developing humanoid robots meant to be piloted by two people

BOSTON, MASS. — Three engineers are leading a team building fifteen-foot-tall, fighting humanoid robots in Boston, Mass., and they are asking the public for help to pull it off. It might sound like science fiction, but it’s not.
Experienced and talented engineers and entrepreneurs Andrew Stroup, Gui Cavalcanti and Matt Oehrlein have teamed up to turn these robots into reality. At the end of October, they will launch a Kickstarter campaign to take things to the next level.
“People keep asking us, ‘Why build giant fighting robots?’” said Andrew Stroup, Co-Founder of MegaBots, Inc. “Our answer is always, ‘Why not?’” All three were raised on video games, movies and science fiction stories that included giant robots, and decided that it was time to turn their skills to good use.
Since the start of summer, they have built a fully functional torso, cockpit, arm, and two main weapons system of a MegaBot. The cockpit seats two adults, a driver who controls the robot’s movements and the gunner who commands the weapons systems.
„Having the MegaBot aim its cannon at you is a heart-stopping experience,” Gui Cavalcanti, Co-Founder 
of MegaBots, Inc. described. “Even if you know it’s not loaded. Here’s this gigantic, armored humanoid robot three times taller than you are, smoothly and quietly lining up its sights on you – it’s downright terrifying.“
The MegaBots team has completed parts of the dream. Soon, they will ask the public for help with the launch of a Kickstarter campaign. 
“There’s no doubt we want to bring MegaBots to the masses,” Matt Oehrlein, Co-Founder of MegaBots, Inc., proclaimed. “We want to know they want it to happen as bad as we do.”

Scratchduino is going to Kickstarter!

ScratchDuino, the Programmable Magnetic Robots Construction Kit is going to Kickstarter.

Mezon.Ru, a winner of Google Rise Awards 2013 and 2014, is proud to announce the launch of  kickstarter campaign for their programmable magnetic robot kit ScratchDuino. The goal is to raise$105,000 by October 24, 2014, and to start the serial production of ScratchDuino robots construction kits in Finland.

Being completely open source, the ScratchDuino robots construction kit allows users to assemble robots utilizing the original set of parts, to modify their robots in a various ways, to program AI, and to share their modifications with STEM robotics community all over world.

Kickstarter project set of rewards includes the robot kit with different versions of body, educational class kit with master class included, all blueprints and assembly schematics (on usb flash and downloadable) for those backers, who would like to create ScratchDuino from scratch completely.

More information about the ScratchDuino robots construction kit can be found here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/scratchduino/scratchduino

Big September for STEM Toy Startup TROBO: Kickstarter Launch, ABC Kids Expo and Maker Faire Orlando

 

TROBO-NowOnKickstarter-2

ORLANDO, Fla. – It’s a big month for TROBO the Storytelling Robot as the company launches its Kickstarter campaign and participates in both the ABC Kids Expo in Las Vegas and Maker Faire Orlando.

Created by two dads, Jeremy Scheinberg and Chris Harden, TROBO is a huggable stuffed robot toy and storytelling app that answers kids’ questions about the science and engineering around them.

The plush storytelling robot, TROBO, uses an interactive storytelling app to read out loud and engage children ages 2-7 through an iPad. They currently have 2 characters…a male TROBO, Edison and a female TROBO, Curie.

“TROBO’s mission is more than just child’s play,” stated Scheinberg. “The goal is to get kids excited about science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in the world around them through exciting and creative story lines that make the child the star of the story.”

TROBO’s Kickstarter campaign launched on Wednesday, September 3rd and raised 1/3 of their $60,000 goal in the first 24 hours. The campaign will fund the first round of manufacturing and complete development of the storytelling application. The campaign – which is accessible at www.TROBOkickstarter.com – aims to appeal to parents and grandparents looking for smarter toys for children.

The company will also be appearing at the ABC Kids’ Expo September 7-10 at the Las Vegas Convention Center where they were accepted into the show’s “Invention Connection” pavilion for innovative juvenile product startups. “We are really excited to meet with toy buyers from all over the world to get more feedback which will help us bring TROBO to market,” said Scheinberg. TROBO will be exhibiting at the show at booth #35 in the Invention Connection.

Rounding out a busy few weeks, the company will also be exhibiting at Maker Faire Orlando at the Orlando Science Center September 13-14. “We have had such great support from the Orlando community since we created TROBO. It will be great to show our product to people who have followed us since the beginning,” said Harden.

So how do two Central Florida fathers invent and prototype this amazing technology toy?
Scheinberg and Harden both have backgrounds in engineering and storytelling.

Jeremy Scheinberg was the Chief Operating Officer at Alcorn McBride, the leading manufacturer of audio, video and control products for themed entertainment with clients including NBC, Universal, Lego and Disney.

Chris Harden was a Development Director with EA Sports, managing the User Experience core technology group for the label and has a history in film and comics.

For more information visit www.HereComesTrobo.com

$40 robot has a shot at Kickstarter crowdfunding

Robotics company, Microbric has done the impossible by developing Edison a small
robot with an amazing array of sensors for under $40, making it the most affordable educational robot in the market. Edison was launched today on Kickstarter. This small yet feature packed robot is set to revolutionise how robotics and programming are taught in schools thanks to its easy to use drag and drop programming software, modular design and intelligent sensors that react to light, sound and remote commands. Its unique design and compatibility with LEGO products lends itself to creativity – the seed of fun robotics to inspire the inventors of tomorrow.

Edison was created to make robotics more accessible to students and hobbyists alike and is the brainchild of Brenton O’Brien, himself an electronics engineer with a passion for robotics. For over 10 years his company, Microbric, has been creating educational robots for hobbyists but his dedication to bringing robotics into mainstream education paid off when the Australian Curriculum changed in January to specifically include robotics within the Digital and Design streams.

‘I realised that my goal was within reach but that the main obstacle to bringing robotics into every classroom was the cost of buying kits for schools with already tight budgets. So I created Edison with the functionality of a much more expensive robot, at a fraction of the price,‘ Brenton said.

But, whilst Brenton’s dream may be within reach, it’s still not a reality until the funding goal on Kickstarter is met and the capital is raised to manufacture Edisons en masse.

Microbric’s Edison Kickstarter campaign seeks to raise $20,000 in 30 days via the crowdfunding website Kickstarter. If they meet their goal, the funds raised will foot the manufacturing bill of an initial production run of robots, which will then be sent to backers wherever they are in the world. If you’re interested in supporting Microbric’s campaign, visit the Meet Edison Kickstarter page. If you want to follow the journey of Edison from idea to reality, track the project’s progress on Facebook, Google+ and the Edison website (www.meetedison.com).

Crowdfunding is an increasing trend in fund raising for new initiatives. It involves the collection of finance from backers to fund a project. Crowdfunding is expected to completely transform venture capital over the next decade.

“We are launching Edison on Kickstarter because we wanted to give people the chance to be part of something that will change the way our children learn about robotics in mainstream education,’ Brenton said

“Now, every child in Australia can learn about robotics and the importance of technology to their future careers. I’m really excited about this launch and hope that parents and teachers alike will back Edison.’

Microbric is a small Adelaide based company which has worked with the Adelaide Advertiser newspaper in producing two collectable robots and initially selling its robots through Dick Smith Electronics. Now, creating all types of robots for over 10 years nearly 100,000 Microbric robots have been manufactured and sold in Australia and overseas. Microbric anticipates that Edison will be its most successful robot yet.

http://www.meetedison.com