MindCuber-RI uses LEGO Mindstorms Robot Inventor 51515 to solve Rubik’s Cube

MindCuber-RI is a robot that can solve the well-known Rubik’s Cube® puzzle. It is designed by David Gilday and Mike Dobson.


It is built using elements from a single LEGO® MINDSTORMS® Robot Inventor set 51515.

MindCuber-RI is significantly faster than previous MindCuber and PrimeCuber designs because it makes use of the fourth motor available in the Robot Inventor set to implement a faster tilting mechanism. Older MINDSTORMS and SPIKE Prime sets only included three motors.

Building instructions and software are now available on http://mindcuber.com/mindcuberri/mindcuberri.html alongside those for MindCuber for LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT, MindCub3r for LEGO MINDSTORMS EV3 and PrimeCuber for LEGO Education SPIKE® Prime.

Orange Tart – Meet a LEGO-compatible Soccer Player Robot

Orange Tart is your family’s newest friend, as it equally attracts girls and boys, kids, and adults. In fact, Orange Tart is a Lego-compatible robot kit that enables you to build amazing striker, chipper, header, and goalkeeper robots. You can’t stop playing with them. Just choose your nation or any color combination for team wear. Using a customized joystick app, Tart Arena, and the robots, you can bring all the soccer fun in your hands and enjoy every feature of realistic robotic soccer. 


What you can Build

Orange Tart has a special board called Orange Core with a Lego-compatible case. It consists of a built-in gyro sensor, RGB LEDs, and a wireless communication device. Rechargeable battery and powerful motors that can be easily connected to Orange Core. Very convenient for kids. Unleash your creativity by building amazing soccer robots or any creature you can imagine, from insect-like robots to industrial cranes. The only limit is your imagination and physics.



What you can Learn

On the learning side, you don’t need to design your own activities. The orange Tart set comes with many STEAM activities that help your kids learn the 21st century’s essential skills. The set has story-driven challenge cards, a block-based coding language, a STEAM activity mat, and a learn-to-code curriculum book. The challenge cards are step-by-step coding missions that lead your kids on the path to becoming a coder. The block-based coding language works by dragging and dropping the function blocks that use intuitive graphics and are divided into motions, loops, light, and sound. The learn-to-code curriculum book contains hints and suggested solutions for every challenge card. Kids can do trial and error to find solutions for each challenge, which improves their creativity and problem-solving skills. In addition to coding concepts such as algorithms, kids can learn the real-world applications of math, geometry, and AI.


Let your kid’s imagination go limitless, turn the LEDs on, move your robots, and do fascinating light painting photography for any occasion. Don’t forget to share your pictures with your friends!

Kickstarter campaign

For more information on the upcoming Kickstarter campaign please check out Orange Tart page.



CoderZ Announces CoderZ League World Champions

Students in grades four through 12 throughout the United States and the world joined in the cloud-based robotics tournament.

DERRY, N.H. (PRWEB) MARCH 02, 2021

CoderZ today announced the winners of the all-new CoderZ League: the Virtual Cyber Robotics Competition (formerly the Cyber Robotics Coding Competition or CRCC). Students in grades four through 12 throughout the United States and the world joined in the cloud-based robotics tournament. Three teams from each of the tournament’s two levels – Junior and Pro – became CoderZ League World Champions.

Beginning coders, schools new to the competition, and students in grades five through eight competed at the CoderZ League Junior level using Blockly. The three CoderZ League World Champion teams were the following:

  • The Legend Z team from Union High School (Pennsylvania)
  • The Avenues FLL MG team 1 from Avenues the World School (New York City)
  • The Method K20 all-girls team from Methodist Girls High School located (Ghana)

The CoderZ League Pro level was for students in grades seven through 12 who could use Blockly or Python. The three CoderZ League World Champion teams were the following:

  • The Virginia Beach ATC team from Virginia Beach City Public Schools (Virginia)
  • The Explosion team from School 1329 (Moscow)
  • The RoboGriffins team from the nonprofit Philadelphia Robotics Coalition (Pennsylvania)

During the tournament missions, students competed on the award-winning CoderZ Cyber Robotics Learning Environment, a cloud-based platform featuring a graphical simulation of LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robots. The students used the virtual 3D robots to complete the tournament challenges or “missions.”

“These six teams outperformed competitors from 18 countries, 29 U.S. states, two Canadian provinces and Puerto Rico,” said Ido Yerushalmi, CEO of CoderZ. “In all, over 150,000 students participated in the CoderZ League; amid the disruption and distress of 2020, all of them dedicated themselves to learning STEM, coding, tech literacy and soft skills like critical thinking and collaboration as they competed. We are so immensely proud of them all.”

Even before the pandemic hit, CoderZ’s successful engagement of students in cyber robotics learning had made its virtual coding tournaments an international phenomenon. In 2019, the vast majority (98%) of surveyed educators stated that the content delivered by CoderZ League’s predecessor, the CRCC, provided a foothold for computer science and STEM learning. And a whopping 100% reported that their students were engaged. “Our model works for both in-class and remote learning,” said Yerushalmi. “So, no matter where students are, CoderZ makes robotics far more accessible to them now and in the future.”

“Due to the pandemic, we were unable to meet in person and construct a physical robot, so students who wanted to continue growing their robotics skills were given the option of participating in CoderZ,” said physics teacher Sean Martin who served as the team coach for RoboGriffins. The RoboGriffins team formed through the Philadelphia Robotics Coalition, a nonprofit dedicated to supporting robotics programs in the city’s public high schools.

Most of the students on the team had previously focused on the mechanical side of robotics. “Students were eager to learn more about coding as it is a crucial component to our usual robotics activities,” Martin explained. “What appealed to us the most about CoderZ was that whatever code you wrote had an instantaneous effect on the robot. There was no waiting for things to compile, and there were no abstract exercises. You wrote a code, and immediately saw what the robot did as a result. The fact that the visual presentation is as appealing as it is certainly helped too.”

The RoboGriffins team took advantage of other CoderZ offerings before writing their world championship code. About 12 students on the team also completed the Amazon Cyber Robotics Challenge. In addition, most of those 12 completed at least three units in either the Cyber Robotics 102 curriculum or the Python Gym course.

“School closures due to COVID-19 were what led to us seeking a virtual platform like CoderZ in the first place,” said Martin. “You allowed us to continue our work of spreading knowledge of robotics in spite of the lockdowns and we are very grateful for it.”

Educators who would like their students to learn or refine their coding skills in a fun, competitive format can still sign them up for the CoderZ League Sprint Challenge, which will run until March 31, 2021.

About CoderZ
CoderZ is an innovative and engaging online learning environment. Developed for students in grades 2 and above, the gamified STEM solution allows student to work at their own pace, easily programming real and virtual robots from anywhere in the world. The platform enables students to acquire computational thinking, problem-solving, and creativity skills, together with coding and STEM learning, all via a flexible and scalable virtual solution. For more information go to http://www.gocoderz.com.

LEGO MINDSTORMS Robot Inventor #51515 Timelapse Video „Blast“

As one of the RobotMak3rs (http://www.robotmak3rs.com/Sebastian-Trella/) and with support by LEGO, I had the opportunity to get my hands on the new LEGO MINDSTORMS Robot Inventor Set #51515 early. Thank you to the RobotMak3rs RLOC and LEGO for making this possible! This is the second video featuring the new MINDSTORMS Set; you will see me doing a timelapse of the build of „Blast“. Blast is one of the 5 robots that come with the 5in1 Set #51515. The other robots will for sure also be shown on this website in the short future.

LegoWorld Utrecht 2018 Photos

SuperBot to the Rescue!

It’s time to do some superpower thinking and show us a Super Robot, a.k.a. SuperBot! Make it super cool, super geeky, super smart, or super fun, and show us what makes your robot a SuperBot – and what dilemma, challenge, or chore it rescues you from! The greatest SuperBot will send his or her creator on a super-duper trip to LEGO World Copenhagen.

Grand Prize: A trip to LEGO World Copenhagen in February 2017 where you will get to show your SuperBot to thousands of LEGO fans.

Judging

A panel of judges from the LEGO MINDSTORMS team will select one grand prize winner and 2 runner-ups. They will judge entries upon:

  • Super-factor originality: 25%
  • Attention to contest theme: 25%
  • Innovative building technique and functions: 25%
  • Innovative use of LEGO elements: 25%

How to enter

  • Visit: https://www.lego.com/en-us/rebrick/contest-page/contests/superbots
  • Create a robot using LEGO bricks and your LEGO MINDSTORMS robot (EV3 or earlier model) or power functions to solve an everyday challenge of your choosing
  • Create a video under 30 seconds showing your creation in action
  • Upload your video to the video hosting site of your choice, such as YouTube
  • Enter the contest by going to the “submit entry” page on LEGO Rebrick and submit maximum 5 screenshots from your video. Make sure to also add the link to your video before you submit
  • Use the description field to describe your robot and its features

Submit your entry at: https://www.lego.com/en-us/rebrick/contest-page/contests/superbots

Entry Deadline

Submit your entry no later than August 18th 2017 at 10:00AM EST.

If you’re not sure what time zone you’re in here’s a time zone converter

CoderZ: Bringing robotics to every student in the world

CoderZ is an online learning environment where kids learn how to program virtual and real robots within the STEM pathways. Problem-solving, critical thinking, computational thinking, teamwork, self-paced learning, formative assessment, robotics, classroom engagement: CoderZ includes all of these concepts and more.

Discovering different new ways to engage the new generations with robotics and with STEM related fields becomes a bigger challenge everyday. That is why, tools like CoderZ are being developed to give teachers, educators, and robotics experts the possibility to take a deep breath.

CoderZ’s new version, now compatible with the LEGO Mindstorms EV3 (through Lejos), enables students to program their own virtual robot and acquire 21st-century skills. Delivered with the “Coding Robots” curriculum, co-developed by Intelitek and Gary Garber, CoderZ becomes an scalable and effective way for students with different levels to experience the robotics world in class.

Having several gamified missions, motivates kids to accomplish them in order to move to a harder level. Also, CoderZ has a class management tool for teachers to track each student progress and activity.

Starting with a friendly drag-and-drop blockly visual editor, kids progress to code their virtual robot using Java.

Recently, the CoderZ team added to their previous FTC, First Tech Challenge, version, the new version mentioned before, which is compatible with the EV3 brick. Right now, the CoderZ team is offering a 14-day free trial which you can sign up for here.

CoderZ even gives you the option of driving and programming your virtual robot on the moon, taking into consideration friction and gravity. And of course, increasing the kids’ engagement with the robotics world. Although, for now, kids’ won’t be able to try their robot on the moon after they download the program, but who knows what Elon Musk will create in the next few years.

Pay some atención! CoderZ’s STEM learning environment is available both in English and in Español… Si señor!

Learn more about CoderZ at http://GoCoderZ.com.

Request your free trial here.

PIX3L PLOTT3R

PIX3L PLOTT3R is a series of printing robots made with LEGO MINDSTORMS EV3s by Sanjay and Arvind Seshan. Different versions provide different features. Some feature a paper feeder, some feature LEGO markers and some feature multiple EV3s working together (Holiday Card Plott3r). Some are programmed in Python and others in EV3-G. Each version also features a different print mechanism.

The original PIX3L PLOTT3Rs from 2016 used parts not available in either MINDSTORMS sets (313131 and 45544), making it hard for others to complete the same project. SCRIB3 is the newest member of the PIX3L PLOTT3R family of robots. It is built with parts available in a single 31313 set. An image processing step is completed in Python to create an image compatible with the EV3. However, the robot uses standard EV3-G code to print.

You can access the project files at www.beyondtheinstructions.com/projects.

Pictures from Legoworld Utrecht 2016