Crowbits Launches Creative Electronic Blocks For STEM Learning on Kickstarter

Thanks to Elecrow, parents who are looking to interest their children in some fun but educational activities can now do precisely that with Crowbits, electronic lego blocks that have been centered around STEM education.

With the Elecrow campaign for Crowbits achieving outdoing its original goal by a mile, it appears that many parents and guardians have recognized the potential of the electronic blocks. With Crowbits, children can learn some of the most in-demand digital skills in the world while having fun. Some of these perks of playing with Crowbits include graphical programming, python programming, hands-on STEM learning, endless ways to use the electronic blocks, and their compatibility with lego.

A few parents and backers have identified Crowbits as the perfect gift item for their wards. By connecting the electronic blocks together, kids can create fully-functional gaming consoles, phones, tech-savvy cars, radar systems, machinery, and more with no coding required.

Crowbits is based upon Arduino, ESP32, Micro:bit Programmable STEM education blocks for kids. These are little magnetically linked blocks that snap together when joined. The system also incorporates Letscode, a graphical programming software where users simply drag and drop elements to create new products.

“The way that we see it, STEM is more important than ever before, and we want children to learn about it and practice it. That way, the next generation can progress more quickly onto the more complex topics,” said David Chu of Elecrow.

The Crowbits package includes multiple main controller modules, input modules, and output modules, with over 80 modules to pick from, wherein circuit systems can be created with LEGO-compatible blocks. In all, there are five kits (Hello, Explorer, Inventor, Creator, and Master), and more than 70 PBL lessons.

Students aged 3-14 years old can play with Crowbits and work on projects, solve problems and think creatively in a step-by-step manner. They can mix and match these blocks with their LEGO blocks too. There are three levels of difficulty as well to make learning progressive: Electronics and engineering, computer science, and the Master level for building fully functional products.

Crowbits has been launched on Kickstarter to raise funds and welcomes all donors and participants to help create this novel system wherein children can be taught at an early age to learn science, technology, engineering, and math with fun, while also building their creative imagination.

For more information, please visit: www.elecrow.com

Bionic Flower: a bionically inspired robot flower

Another step for the integral didactic concept of Bionics4Education

Festo Didactic presents a new product for the bionics didactic concept of Bionics4Education. What is new: the orientation towards the maker movement approach and the 4Cs. The aim is inspiring learners, finding new ways and solutions, dealing creatively with provided materials, and sharing these experiences with others to prepare them for the digital world of tomorrow.

Inspired by the plant world

The Bionic Flower is a construction kit inspired by the plant world. Festo Didactic developed the Bionic Flower following the models of mimosa plants and water lilies in cooperation with SkySpirit. The Bionic Flower opens and closes its petals as a reaction to external influences such as touch, proximity or light. These mechanisms can be discovered in a playful way by pupils in the classroom using sensors and control technology integrated in the Bionic Flower. The design, as well as the transfer of principles from the plant world, rounds off the teaching of curriculum topics in STEM education (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Maths). The topic of biodiversity can also be discussed in class.

Bionic work didactically prepared

One Bionic Flower can be used by up to three students at a recommended age of 10 and over. The petals contain the first bionic topic: the folding technique. The petals gain the necessary mechanical stiffness by folding. The mechanism for opening and closing the petals is electrically actuated with a stepper motor which opens and closes the petals one after the other. The movement and the light effects are controlled via Wi-Fi-enabled smartphones, tablets or PCs. If required, the microcontroller can be programmed with the graphic coding interface „Open Roberta“. Experienced students can also program their Bionic Flower in C++. The code is open source. This enables teachers to teach technical content via a new, interdisciplinary educational path. Accompanying teaching material, as well as the assembly manual, can be downloaded free of charge from our website www.bionics4education.com.

An expanded approach to promoting valuable skills

Students learn different aspects of STEM with the Bionic Flower – in a digital, creative and interdisciplinary way. The Bionic Flower combines bionics and technical education and is thus based on the competencies of the 4Cs: collaboration, communication, critical thinking and creativity to empower learners for the digital world of tomorrow.
In addition, soft skills such as working in a team are reinforced.

New in the concept: the maker movement approach

The maker movement is based on the DIY (do it yourself) culture and the idea of finding new ways and solutions, dealing creatively with materials, and sharing these experiences with others. The Bionic Flower takes this approach and combines Maker Education and STEM Education. In addition to assembling the Bionic Flower, learners can customize and expand on the Bionic Flower by using 3D printers, other materials, hardware and software.