Rotrics DexArm Installation und erste Zeichnung

In diesem Video seht ihr, nur leicht beschleunigt, wie schnell sich der Rotrics DexArm Roboterarm anschließen, einrichten und in Betrieb nehmen lässt. Für einen ersten Test, lasse ich den Roboterarm mein RobotsBlog Logo zeichnen.

Zuvor habe ich die neueste Firmware und Software installiert, sowie mich mit dem TouchPanel auseinandergesetzt und dessen Funktion getestet. Rechnet man diese Zeit heraus, so dauert es vom Auspacken bis zur erstens Verwendung des Roboterarms höchstens fünf Minuten.

Verzichtet man auf die Anbindung an den Computer oder das Verwenden eines eigenen Logos zu Testzwecken, kann der Roboterarm komplett über das Touchpanel eingerichtet und direkt ausprobiert werden. So könnte man sogar noch schneller mit dem Rotrics DexArm starten und benötigt noch nicht einmal einen Computer.

Insgesamt ist die Bedienung sehr einfach und die Software führt einen am Computer durch alle notwendigen Schritte. Hier sind keinerlei Vorkenntnisse erforderlich. Das Schreiben von Text oder Zeichnen von Grafiken mit dem Roboterarm könnte wirklich nicht einfacher sein.

500 ROBOTS mini sketchbook

500 ROBOTS is a 1 to 1 reproduction of a sketchbook that artist GABO began filling in May 2020 and finally completed in September 2020. The entire book was done straight to ink, meaning that he had little to no plan on what was going to be drawn! A lot of what you’ll find in this book will be robot sketches, but also includes a mess of random sci-fi mechanics and even a few mini-comics! The last two pages of the book explain some of the tools and techniques used while making it. Each page also includes annotations on the sides and bottom explaining my process and thoughts! This 52-page perfect-bound book is full color and measures 6″ x 4.5″.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/gabo/500-robots-mini-sketchbook

Matt Dixon Robot Calendar 2018

British illustrator Matt Dixon is bringing his 2018 robot calendar to Kickstarter in September. The calendar will be A3 in size, offset printed in full colour, spiral bound and features a robot artwork printed full page for each month of the year.

The images are drawn from Matt’s ‚Transmissions‘ series of  robot art books. The first volume was published in 2013, followed by a second funded by a successful Kickstarter campaign in 2015. Another Kickstarter campaign in 2017 gave birth to the third volume in the series, plus two books of ‚Blueprints‘ featuring drawings from Matt’s sketchbooks showing the development of some of the paintings in the ‚Transmissions‘ collection in addition to ideas that have yet to become finished paintings.

Matt is reluctant to share much information about his robots or the world they inhabit, preferring to allow the viewer to interpret the images as they find them.

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Bio

Matt Dixon was born in Birmingham, England in 1972 and has been an enthusiastic waver of brushes, crayons and pens for as long as he can remember. He began to use computers as an artistic tool in 1980 and first  contributed graphics to videogames as a teenager. Matt went on to work full time in games development before making the jump to freelance in 2012. He now works as an illustrator and concept artist, still mostly within the games industry.

 

Canadian visual artist Andrei Feheregyhazi seeks to create a ‘Sexy Robot Pin-Up Calendar.’

 

Andrei came up with the idea while working on designs for an upcoming book project featured robots.  One of the designs was a box with one eyeball and arms.  He showed it to the woman sitting next to him and mentioned he still needed to add legs.  She said, “you should make them sexy legs.”  He did, and that gave birth to the Sexy Robot Pin-Up Calendar.

Andrei is intrigued by the fact that robots are not inherently sexy, but his robots do their best to look sexy.   As robots, they don’t they don’t understand human sexuality and attraction.  As a result, they look to sexy calendars, sexy Halloween costumes, television and movies, and burlesque shows.  Due to this the robots create an adorably awkward version of “Sexy.”

While the calendar is meant to be fun and enjoyable, it also explores issues of sexuality, objectification, and gender identity. The robots don’t identify as any gender.  This means that although a firefighter with washboard abs is typically seen as male, there’s no reason the viewer couldn’t decide it was female or not assign a gender.

The Kickstarter campaign has set a goal of $9,000 and describes the calendar as „featuring adorable robots trying their best to look sexy and romance their way into your hearts.“

„I like the idea of things that don’t understand human attraction trying their best to represent human attraction,“ said Feheregyhazi.