RoboCup Leipzig: Using small robots to learn for the big robots

Most people know robots as machines that accurately perform previously defined processes. Their advantage over other industrial equipment is that they can be used in a variety of situations due to their considerable flexibility. To further increase this level of flexibility, Augsburg-based automation specialist KUKA relies on an intensive exchange with the global robotics community. Competitions such as RoboCup translate tasks from the factory of the future into scientific challenges for the researchers. In this way, competition among the teams gives rise to innovative solutions that are needed to further enhance production towards Industry 4.0. At Leipziger Messe, these approaches can be experienced live at RoboCup from 30 June to 3 July.

A third hand for humans

Even now, increasingly intelligent robots play an important part in modern factories. De-mographic change and steadily growing demand for higher productivity and quality, along with lower costs, have the effect of raising the requirements for future robot-based auto-mation, particularly in the installation area. As an ageing workforce is supported by robotic colleagues, it becomes very important to ensure the safe co-existence of workers and robots, and to develop a correspondingly sensitive robot assistant.

KUKA’s light construction robot LBR iiwa (intelligent industrial work assistant) demonstrates how the knowledge transfer from research and competitions such as RoboCup to the actual production environment works precisely for these types of challenges. The robot’s arm is very sensitive, and therefore optimally suited for this type of task, turning it into the equivalent of a third human hand. The robot can handle fragile and sensitive objects, detects the position of the components to be used, and installs them with the required amount of force. In this way, production rejects or a collisions can be avoided. “Today’s production environment requires a maximum amount of flexibility and transformation due to steadily increasing product and model diversity. LBR iiwa can meet these requirements and thus enables processes that were hitherto inconceivable in terms of automation,” says Dr. Rainer Bischoff, Manager of Group Research at KUKA, and explains: “Its sensors and control technology also make it so safe that humans and robots can work alongside each other without having to be separated by protective walls.”

Flexible through mobility

The considerable demands on robots are especially evident in the area of mobility. That is because stationary robots in particular quickly reach their limit. Dr. Bischoff: “Industrial production in the future will require new, modular, versatile and above all mobile production concepts.” For this reason, KUKA has equipped its LBR iiwa with an autonomous navigating platform and created the KMR iiwa (KMR = KUKA Mobile Robotics), a new intelligent and mobile helper that enables direct, autonomous and flexible collaboration between humans and robots. With its high-performance battery, autonomous navigation, ability to position exactly to the millimeter, and its modular design, the KMR iiwa is an in-dustrial production assistant for many logistics and production processes.

Interface for the future of robotics

Since each innovation always starts with a first small step, KUKA will bring the youBot to RoboCup on the Leipziger Messe exhibition grounds. The robot is an omni-directional mobile platform that features a five-axis robot arm with a two-finger grip. The device can be used to realize control systems and application ideas. Its biggest advantage: The youBot can be run with many open source software packages and other software (C++ API, ROS, Orocos, LabView and many more). “The KUKA youBot offers researchers, teachers and students, as well as research and development departments in industry a hardware basis for trying new things and for scaling the insights to other applications. In this way, the KUKA youBot can be used to research the important issues of the factory of the future on the way to Industry 4.0 on a smaller scale,” explains Dr. Bischoff.

Speaking of Industry 4.0: Visitors can experience the current state of research for the fac-tory of the future at the RoboCup competitions in the [email protected] league, in the ini-tiation of which KUKA played a key role. Differently from the soccer-playing and service robotics-oriented competitions, the participants in this competition focus on researching and developing the use of robots in industrial settings. In this context, robots are supposed to perform complex tasks in collaboration with humans, e.g. in production, automation or general logistics processes. Real-life industrial challenges are supposed to form the basis for robust mobile manipulation, which can be scaled and therefore can be used on a much larger scale.

To ensure even better comparability for competition participants, and in order to run the competitions in several rounds at different times and in different locations (similar to the Champions League in soccer), KUKA initiated the establishment of the European Robotics League with other science partners and with the help of subsidies from the European Commission. The RoboCup in Leipzig marks the official starting point for this European league which – using the three robotics areas industry, services and rescue, all of which have societal relevance – will give rise to ground-breaking developments, even better training for tomorrow’s engineers and computer scientists and higher acceptance in the population for supportive robot technologies. Dr. Bischoff: “Constant competition is a key prerequisite for innovation. RoboCup in Leipzig is the perfect interface between the current state of development and the pioneering solutions for the challenges of the future.”

About RoboCup

RoboCup is the leading and most diverse competition for intelligent robots, and one of the world’s most important technology events in research and training. The World Cup of robots combines a variety of interdisciplinary problems from robotics, artificial intelligence, informatics, as well as electrical and mechanical engineering, among others. As the central discipline, robots play soccer in different leagues. Additional visionary application disciplines such as intelligent robots as assistants for rescue missions, in households and in industrial production have been added during the last few years. The vision of the RoboCup Federation: That autonomous humanoid robots beat the reigning soccer world champion in 2050. The 20th RoboCup will be held in Leipzig from 30 June to 4 July 2016. More than 500 teams from 40 countries with 3,500 participants are expected to compete at this event. The 2016 world championships is supported by global RoboCup sponsors (SoftBank Robotics, Festo, Flower Robotics, MathWorks) as well as Siemens (Gold Sponsor), Amazon Robotics, Festo, KUKA (Silver Sponsors), Schenker, TUXEDO Computers (Hardware Partner), HARTING, Arbeitgeberverband Gesamtmetall / think ING, S&P Sahlmann (Bronze Sponsors), DHL (Logistics Partner) and arvato, Donaubauer, Flughafen Leipzig/Halle, Metropolregion Mitteldeutschland und Micro-Epsilon (Friends).

AUTOMATICA 2016: Robotics – Introducing a new robot generation

For the first time this year, all renowned robotics manufacturers with innovations across the board will be at AUTOMATICA in Munich from June 21 to 24. Gone are the days when progress was defined by improvements in details. This time solutions are signaling a new era of automation with new approaches that do justice to the demands of human-robot collaboration (MRC) and Industry 4.0.

The robotics business around the world is booming. The World Robot Association IFR reported a global sales record of eight percent in 2015 in the industrial robot sector. The number of industrial robots sold worldwide reached the mark of 240,000 units for the first time.

„The worldwide sales of industrial robots in 2015 confirmed that we are in very exciting times for the robot industry,“ Per Vegard Nerseth, Managing Director at ABB Robotics, stated. „With the start into 2016, the traditional drivers in our industry are being complemented by a huge demand for solutions in the Internet of Things (IoT) as well as the services & people areas. I believe that this development will result in a new record year.“

MRC: A new generation of robots is ready for the market
Collaborating robots are paving a revolutionary new way for SMEs to automate their production on an optimum technical level and consequently secure their competitive position while cutting costs. Manufacturers are taking different approaches in developing their collaborative robots. While one faction, including ABB, Kuka, Universal Robots, Yaskawa and Co. relies on special machines for MRC, Stäubli and Fanuc design their standard robots for MRC applications. A big advantage for AUTOMATICA visitors: All major robot manufacturers are represented at the trade fair, which enables a direct comparison of these solutions.

Per Vegard Nerseth, Managing Director of ABB Robotics, expects a new record year for robotics.

Photo: ABB


Industry 4.0 and MRC

Stäubli will highlight the performance of his new TX2 six-axle series in a variety of demonstration applications at its largest ever AUTOMATICA booth. In a realistic smart factory, different TX2 models in several linked cells put their Industry 4.0 compatibility as well as their collaborative skills to the test. The mobile, autonomous robot system HelMo will be employed for the first time, which makes mobile use possible for the TX2 six-axle robot.

AUTOMATICA is the most important trade fair event this year for Gerald Vogt, Managing Director of Stäubli Robotics.

Photo: Stäubli

You can also see the major trends in robotics of highly flexible and tightly networked I4.0 production concepts, intuitive operation of robots and MRC solutions at Kuka. In networked production installed at its booth, Kuka is linking its products designed for Industry 4.0, including the mobile KMR iiwa and the Swisslog shelving system Cyclone Carrier, a prime example of a modern production concept. Via the Swisslog software Warehouse Manager WM 6, all components of the smart factory are able to communicate with each other and provide information about the respective order status.

In addition to solutions for networked production, Kuka is exhibit-ing new six-axis robots, including the small robot KR 3 Agilus.

Photo: Kuka Roboter


Green „CR World“ on the „Yellow Highway“

With 24 system partners, Fanuc is exhibiting the full range of robotics on the „Yellow Highway”. New features include the collaborative robot CR 7iA and the heavyweight M-2000iA with a payload of 2,300 kg. Another highlight is the „Green CR World“, in which simple application examples as well as unusual use ideas for collaborative robots can be seen. There is also plenty of space for the ideas and solutions of system integrators on the 3,000 square meter booth. New integrators have joined the partners of the first AUTOMATICA fairs. „As a result, we expect a record number of participants this year,“ Olaf Kramm, Managing Director of Fanuc Germany, stated with obvious pleasure; he will be accompanied by his international team at AUTOMATICA.

The importance of AUTOMATICA as platform for the robot market and the outstanding success of FANUC Germany have aroused the curiosity of Dr. Yoshiharu Inaba. The President and CEO of FANUC Corporation wants to get a direct overview of the German and European markets, as well as meet customers and system integrators at the „Yellow Highway”. For this reason the top management of FANUC Corporation will visit the AUTOMATICA in Munich for the first time.

The basis of the new collaborative Fanuc CR 7iA is an LR Mate 200iD with 7 kg carrying load.

Photo: Fanuc

Yaskawa is also betting on the known fashionable topics, but it also has new robot on board. Bruno Schnekenburger, Division Director Robotics at Yaskawa Europe, stated: “We are going to introduce a newly developed model for MRC applications for the first time in Europe at AUTOMATICA with the Motoman HC10. The robot is extremely slim, so it can be integrated optimally into cramped spaces.“  The new GP series with the Motoman GP7 and GP8 also has a similar slim design. These robots will score with speed, ranges and interfaces for integration into automation environments on the Industry 4.0 level.

The collaborative robot Motoman HC10 from Yaskawa is celebrating its European premiere.

Photo: Yaskawa


AUTOMATICA shows the complete range of automation

In line with current requirements in the digital manufacturing era, Fraunhofer IPA is presenting different exhibits covering the fields of people at the workplace, products and automation as well as IT infrastructure and networking. Consequently, they demonstrate the added value of production in the sense of Industry 4.0.

In addition to the hot topics, AUTOMATICA is also showing the world of conventional robotics from vision sensors to spot welding guns and all the way to heavy-duty robots. „AUTOMATICA illuminates all facets of automation, and all major exhibitors of the industry are represented. Consequently, this fair is the most important event this year for many exhibitors. It will show the extent to which visions of future automation have become reality,“ Gerald Vogt, Managing Director of Stäubli Robotics, stated.

Industry 4.0 and MRK solutions will be the focus at the booth of the Fraunhofer IPA.

Photo: IPA

Low Cost Walking Robot Makes It Easy To Get Into Robotics

The mePed is a robot kit that was designed from the ground up to be an affordable, easy to build robot for beginners and experts alike.

Spierce Technologies announced today that it is raising funds via a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter to finish development and drive down the cost of their flagship walking robot, the mePed. The company has set out to raise at least $5,000 to fund the first batch of mePed kits and give them enough orders to negotiate better pricing and make the kits more affordable for everyone.

The mePed is a four legged quadruped robot that comes in kit form which the user assembles using the included tools. Out of the box, it’s not much more than just a remote control toy but what make the mePed robot special is that it is completely open source and programmable. The source code used to make the mePed work is pre-programmed on the robots controller from the factory. This code can be modified by the user to make the robot do almost anything from navigating mazes, avoiding obstacles, dancing, waving, or even finding a fire and putting it out with the use of additional sensors.

Making low cost, high quality robot kits accessible to as many people as possible is the driving force behind the mePed Kickstarter campaign. When most walking robots cost upwards of $200 or more, with a successful Kickstarter campaign, Spierce Technologies can bring the mePed to market for less than $100.

The mePed kit includes everything needed to assemble a fully functioning, programmable robot. In addition to the robot body and servo motors, the kit include an Infrared Remote for giving the robot commands, an Ultrasonic Range Sensor for measuring the distance from objects in front of the robot, an Arduino compatible micro controller or the brains of the mePed, as well as the nuts, bolts, and wrenches needed to assemble the kit. The user only needs to supply 4 AA batteries.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1881661007/meped-the-mini- quadruped-mobile-robot

Photon – a Child Friendly Code Teaching Robot About to Join Kickstarter

BIALYSTOK, Poland, 10.05.2016 – Photon Entertainment announced a crowdfunding campaign for Photon – world’s first interactive robot that grows up with children while teaching them programming.
The campaign is launching on May 31st and will take place over the course of six weeks. Price ranges from $149 for a super early bird version to $199 for a regular one. Stretch goals include backer exclusive accessories for the robot (such as a jetpack or mouth allowing for speech visualization) as well as donations for various child related charities (cancer wards, orphanages and others).

Photon is a robot meant to educate children through a mixture of storytelling, challenges and latest technology. It comes equipped with a variety of sensors that allow it to see, hear, feel the touch, distinguish between light and dark, measure proximity and more. Programming language used by the robot is inspired by Scratch and Google Blockly, which makes it simple and digestible by even the youngest users.


The robot comes with a paired application adjusted for both smartphones and tablets. Here, children learn the story of Photon – a little robot whose flying saucer crashed on earth. By completing coding related tasks they help him gain his senses back, and rebuild his spaceship. App encourages friendly competition and cooperation thanks to the inclusion of high scores, leaderboards and daily tasks. Experience points gained by progressing allow kids to customize their robot and decide the order in which he develops, making each unit unique.
“In four years there will be a gap of over a million computing jobs and candidates available for grabbing” says Marcin Joka, the CEO of Photon Entertainment. “We want to take part in closing that gap and proving that with a proper set of tools even a six year old can successfully learn how to code, and have a huge advantage in his or her future career”. The idea for creating Photon comes from minds of Marcin Joka, Krzysztof Dziemańczuk, Michał Bogucki and Maciej Kopczyński, four students and one academic lecturer form Bialystok University of Technology, Poland. The creators have received numerous distinctions and honorable mentions for their work. One of team members took part in creating an award winning Mars Rover Hyperion 2.

Rokenbok Toys Come to Life with Arduino Programming

Solana Beach, CA – Rokenbok Education launched a Kickstarter campaign today for the ROKduino Programmable Robotics Set. The set comes with step-by-step instructions to build and program a beetle bot, a scorpion hunter and an auto-Ferris Wheel. With over 400 building components, including sensors, motor modules, hinges, wheels and gears – and a brand new Arduino-based smart block – imagination is the only limit to what children can build.

The heart of this robotics set is the new ROKduino smart block. After building their creation with Rokenbok building components, children plug the ROKduino into a computer and start coding. With Rokenbok’s step-by-step instructions and drag-and-drop programming, kids as young as eight years old can enjoy the satisfaction of bringing their robots to life. After mastering the basics, it’s a snap to step into full Arduino programming. Rokenbok will supply code blocks that can be downloaded from their site, but users are also free to use code from anywhere in the Arduino community.

“Understanding how technology works is so valuable to today’s children, and we love helping them build these skills,” says Paul Eichen, Executive Director of Rokenbok Education. “Learning about robotics includes computer science, mechanical and structural engineering, and physics. I just love seeing the incredible ideas children come up with as they learn through play.”
The microcontroller in the ROKduino smart block is an ATmega32U4, which is the same chip used in the Arduino Leonardo. Everything included in the robotics set, including the ROKduino, can snap into every building component Rokenbok has ever produced. Plus, Rokenbok will be providing downloadable CAD files for 3D printers, so families will be able to create their own custom components.
The Rokenbok Programmable Robotics Set will retail for $300, but will go for $249 during the Kickstarter campaign and as little as $175 for the first fifty backers.

Maker Faire Hannover 2016

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IronBot Robotics Kit for Children Launches IndieGogo Campaign

XiaMen, China – May 22, 2016 – IronBot is a 3-in-1 buildable and programmable robotics kit for children age 8 and up. Kids will learn STEM and  robotics, when they happily create a “little robot friend” of their own. On Tuesday, May 17, it was launched on Indiegogo, with early bird perk starting from just $89.  (Indiegogo Link: https://igg.me/at/ironbot/x/12259168)


IronBot Includes three choices: a „Robot Arm,“ a „Biped Robot,“ or a „Humanoid Robot.“ As a step-by-step robotic learning kit, the robots are perfect for education and technical instruction, and are a fun playtime activity for children 8 years and up.

IronBot helps children to learn by following step-by-step easy instructions, easily explaining the components, which include, a servo-motor, manipulator assembly, Biped Robot and the Humanoid Robot. The IronBot kit will open the door to the world of robots to children of all ages.
According to the founders of IronBot, „Children can control their IronBot by Bluetooth®, and IronBot offers a coordinating, dedicated app. The robotic arm will pick up small objects or play a balloon game. The app can also race two biped robots. When a robot transforms to the next level humanoid form, kids can use a mobile phone to act as the brain of IronBot. Children will learn by audio and visual interaction using the mobile phone’s camera and microphone.“
The kit comes with a multimode progressive assembly, graphic programming and a personalization setting. Kids can name their robot, and program a personality, voice and story with a customized setting. The kit can be augmented by the children by crafting unique parts for their IronBots, creating unique characteristics on their own.


For more information visit www.ironbot.net.

Find Ironbot on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ironbotforkids/, Twitter: @IronbotforKids, and on YouTube: https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCALVYMZ5RCrYsGO4EOxS11A

Innovators offered chance to develop their ideas with world leading robotics manufacturer ABB Robotics

London, U.K. – 1 May 2016 –Innovation platform, The IdeaHub, is once again recruiting robotics and software innovators worldwide to take on the challenge of improving the way we work and interact with the next generation of industrial robots. Working on behalf of ABB Robotics, IdeaHub will help successful applicants pitch their ideas and secure uniquely tailored support packages to maximise their venture’s commercial potential, including investment, mentoring and access to cutting edge hardware.

The IdeaHub is a cross sector, open innovation platform that connects visionaries worldwide with funding and support from global corporations. In 2015 they ran their first programme for ABB Robotics, attracting over 130 applicants with 12 finalists selected for a pitch day in London, with 6 entrepreneurs receiving an offer of support. For 2016 they are partnering with ABB Robotics once again to bring more solutions to solve three core challenges in the world collaborative industrial robotics:

1.) Simplicity: How to simplify robotics

2.) Intelligence: How to enable robots to learn and apply that learning

3.) Digitalization: How smart connectivity will enhance digital factories.

Much more information can be found at www.theideahub.co.uk/challenges.

 

The IdeaHub platform launches today and is open for applications until 30th July 2016. Successful applicants will get the chance to pitch their ideas directly to ABB Robotics at an IdeaHub event in August 2016. There is no limit to number of offers that might be made, which can include funding, access to robots, technology and commercial support as appropriate to the needs of their business.

Simon Blair, from the IdeaHub said, “This is a great opportunity for robotics and software innovators and entrepreneurs around the world to collaborate with a leading robotics company and take their idea to the next level.  All negotiations are directly between successful applicants and ABB Robotics, so outcomes can be structured to the specific needs of each successful venture. Our programme aims to compliment your business and not restrict it in anyway – we don’t operate an incubator period, we don’t set any pre-defined terms and we don’t insist on equity sacrifice as part of any deals borne out of the programme.”

Applying to the IdeaHub takes a few minutes and only requires information already in the public domain. Visit www.theideahub.co.uk for more information and further contact details.

FRANKA EMIKA: Everybody’s Robot

KBee announces the world’s first cost-efficient Industry 4.0 robot that everybody can program and safely use.

Munich, Germany – April 23, 2016. KBee introduces FRANKA EMIKA—a revolutionary human-centered robotic system—to the market. FRANKA EMIKA is designed for human-robot collaboration, is extremely cost-efficient and lives in the cloud. FRANKA EMIKA is also the first robot that builds itself; therefore perfectly suited for mass production.

FRANKA_EMIKA

FRANKA EMIKA was built, designed and developed by KBee AG. It is a collaborative, lightweight robot system that is designed specifically to serve and seamlessly interact with humans. FRANKA EMIKA can be operated and programmed by anyone, regardless of technical skill, in just a few minutes through a visually intuitive setup process.

FRANKA EMIKA consists of the robot system FRANKA ARM and FRANKA CONTROL, the gripper FRANKA HAND, the software FRANKA DESK, and is connected to the FRANKA CLOUD.

KBee’s CEO, Sami Haddadin, states that, “We strongly believe that FRANKA EMIKA will be a game changer not only in intelligent robotics but also far beyond, opening the doors to a new world of connected digital intelligence accessible to everybody.

FRANKA ARM is a human-safe, force-limited robot arm with torque sensors in all 7 axes that enable humanlike arm agility and sensitivity. FRANKA EMIKA also has a unique workspace that ranges from close to its base to a maximum reach equivalent to the length of a human arm. With a payload of 3 kg and a repeatability of 0.1mm, FRANKA ARM enables a wide range of possible applications for customers.

Prof. Gerd Hirzinger, who was the first robotics researcher to receive all international robotics and automation awards, says, „Worldwide, robotics researchers are convinced that sensitive torque controlled robots are the future; in particular when considering the large scale future topics such as robotic assistance, safe human-robot collaboration in production or service robotics. Interestingly, this novel technology was often considered to be far too complex to be realized. However, the FRANKA EMIKA robot is the perfect exemplar of the synergies between mechatronics and digitalization in the context of Industry 4.0, and I believe it is the long yearned for breakthrough.“

FRANKA DESK, which is the visual and APP-based programming software, runs on the browsers of everyday devices like tablets and computers. Thanks to its intuitive, user-centered set-up and programming system, no special skills are necessary to operate the robot, even for its most complex applications. Therefore, everybody can easily operate FRANKA EMIKA.

With the revolutionary FRANKA CLOUD, it is possible to deploy 1 or 1,000 FRANKA EMIKA robots in no time, and to share and archive TASKS and APPs locally or globally. FRANKA CLOUD enables a seamless connection to Industry 4.0.

FRANKA EMIKA will be unveiled to the public on April 25, 2016 at Hannover Messe Hall 17 / G17.

 

About KBee AG:

KBee AG is based in Munich and was founded in 2013 by the DLR spinoff, Kastanienbaum GmbH. Its main investor, KUKA AG, is one of the world’s leading robot manufacturers. KBee develops and designs human-centered industrial robots that can be used by anyone and are unmatched in cost-efficiency. KBee’s vision is to make robots a commodity by putting humans at the center of robot design, to introduce the most intuitive customer experience, and to connect automation with digitalization.

All new Little Robot Friends Wrap STEM Principles in a Tiny, Adorable package

Launched this morning on Kickstarter, Little Robot Friends (LRF) are an exciting addition to any modern learning environment. Cute and programmable, these robotic characters serve as a novel entry-point for learning code and electronics along with crucial STEM/STEAM skills.

Geared towards children aged 8 and up, LRF’s are available in 4 models – Spikey, Curvy,
Ghosty and the all new Crafty. Each model features a distinctly shaped body, various
sensing modules and a unique, customizable personality. Spikey, Curvy and Ghosty are
available pre-assembled or as DIY kits for those looking to build their soldering skills. Crafty comes as a kit with all the same components as the other robots, but those components are modular and reusable. This provides an endless combination of interaction possibilities for modelling STEAM topics. Little Robot Friends characters evolve organically through play or can be customizable through coding.

Children can transform Crafty into custom creations with any conductive material such as
alligator clips, wire or using conductive thread or yarn. The kit opens up the potential for
children to create an LRF in a myriad of materials including paper craft, felt or 3D-printed
objects. Little Robot Friends bridges the gap between the technical and non-technical skills in a playful way by utilizing soft skills such as teamwork, collaboration and critical thinking.

Little Robot Friends purpose extends beyond physical play. Students and instructors can
also program LRF across several platforms, each suitable for a different skill level. The LRF App introduces programming concepts without the need for coding. Through the app,
children can upload tricks to their robot, customize its personality, teach it to sing robot
songs and play games. In the Little Robot Friends visual programming language, beginner
coders can use drag-and-drop elements to create and run functional programs for the
robot. As students become more confident in their programming, they can move on to
using the LRF library for Arduino. Each of these platforms introduce children to computer
programming in a creative, exploratory way and help them build a solid foundation in
computational thinking. This will put them at a huge advantage to becoming effective
problem solvers in a increasingly technology-dependent world.

Integrating computer literacy into the curriculum is a vital issue in modern education. Little
Robot Friends provides illustrative educational materials meant for both classroom learning and individual exploration. Instructors are aided by the easy-to-follow lessons plans that support core curricular items such as math, science and language arts. The robots friendly persona and tactile design encourages experiential learning, either independently or in groups. Little Robot Friends have been designed to facilitate learning across subjects and disciples to make technology more accessible and fun.

“We feel the best way to teach technology is to make learning casual and rewarding” says
Mark Argo, founder and principal technologist at Aesthetec Studio. “Developing characters
and stories is common across all ages and cultures. With Little Robot Friends we encourage children to creatively experiment with technology to make their characters expressive and unique.”

Little Robot Friends can be purchased on the campaign website until May 27th, 2016 at
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/aesthetec/all-new-little-robot-friends