Cubelets Robot Blocks

Cubelets® robot blocks by Modular Robotics are a fast and easy way to inspire kids to become better thinkers. Simply snap Cubelets together to easily create your own robots, no programming required. The behavior of your robot is determined by your construction. How your robot behaves emerges from what blocks you use and how you orient them.

Cubelets are unique in that you can code any Cubelet to do something new. Programming the various parts in parallel helps you learn about how systems work. It provides intuitions about how parts interact to become something bigger than themselves.

More on these interesting Cubelets and the modular robots you can build with them will follow soon on robots-blog.com as we have a kit in our hands and have just started to play with it!

Maker Faire Ruhr 2019

Electrocuting Robot by Ethan David

Ethan David just messaged me and sent me a video:

“ I made the robot using an arduino, a servo motor, and cardboard boxes. Most of the heavy lifting is taken care of in python doing the fast fourier transform on the sound detected by the microphone to find the frequency being played. This allows me to compare the frequency to the known frequency of the musical scale. It then becomes trivial to just program in the correct sequence of notes for the song and see if what I play matches it. „

Museum Speelklok Utrecht – Robots love music

The international exhibition entitled ‘Robots love Music’ reveals that historical and modern-day robots not only have a brain, but also have a heart!

It’s not just the museum that will be showcasing robots; this autumn, the entire city of Utrecht will go robotic. At various locations around town, Museum Speelklok, universities, venues, and musicians will organise a wide variety of robot events.

Robots with a heart and soul?

They certainly exist! Through time musical ‘robots’ have been evolving from simply mimicking human movements to composing music independently and even improvising, just as we do.

Which musical robots?

They will come in all sizes, shapes and varieties from every corner of the world: ancient robots, interactive robots, metal robots, supersonic robots, life-size robots, cabinets with concealed robots and lots of invisible musicians. All of them will play music ‘live’.

Straight from the USA, the ultramodern and amiable music-making robot Shimon will arrive. The impressive man-size 18th-century Clarinet Player of Dutch making, which wound up in the USA, will make a special trip to Utrecht for the exhibition. From the film of the same name, the French automaton Hugo can be admired in its role as the cinematic link between the world of humans and machines.

Can robotic musicians move you? Find out for yourself at the interactive exhibition Robots love Music. Open from the 21st of September 2018 untill 3th of March 2019.

https://www.museumspeelklok.nl/exhibition-robots-love-music/

Exhibition Robots love Music

 

 

LegoWorld Utrecht 2018 Photos

Maker Faire Eindhoven 2018

Maker Faire Ruhr 2018

Two days @ LEGOWorld Utrecht 2017 as seen from my Mak3rBot LEGO MINDSTORMS robot

Matt Dixon Robot Calendar 2018

British illustrator Matt Dixon is bringing his 2018 robot calendar to Kickstarter in September. The calendar will be A3 in size, offset printed in full colour, spiral bound and features a robot artwork printed full page for each month of the year.

The images are drawn from Matt’s ‚Transmissions‘ series of  robot art books. The first volume was published in 2013, followed by a second funded by a successful Kickstarter campaign in 2015. Another Kickstarter campaign in 2017 gave birth to the third volume in the series, plus two books of ‚Blueprints‘ featuring drawings from Matt’s sketchbooks showing the development of some of the paintings in the ‚Transmissions‘ collection in addition to ideas that have yet to become finished paintings.

Matt is reluctant to share much information about his robots or the world they inhabit, preferring to allow the viewer to interpret the images as they find them.

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Bio

Matt Dixon was born in Birmingham, England in 1972 and has been an enthusiastic waver of brushes, crayons and pens for as long as he can remember. He began to use computers as an artistic tool in 1980 and first  contributed graphics to videogames as a teenager. Matt went on to work full time in games development before making the jump to freelance in 2012. He now works as an illustrator and concept artist, still mostly within the games industry.

 

London Science Museum – Robots Exhibiton

London Science Museum – Robots Exhibiton